Not all travel nurses choose their career for the adventure

Getting excited to leave for a new city and start a fresh job is why so many nurses choose the traveling lifestyle.

Travel nursing provides opportunities to nurses that are rarely available in other professions.

Although many nurses have choosen traveling for the adventure, excitement and exploration it provides, a whole other group of nurses have chosen traveling for completely pragmatic reasons. Whether it’s to take care of a family member or to earn more as the sole bread winner, travel nursing provides opportunities to nurses that are rarely available in other professions.

Here are some alternative reasons nurses might choose to pursue a career (or a short side-trip) into travel nursing:

To take care of family 

One of the benefits of a career as a traveling nurse is that your ability to take assignments wherever you please – and this could be an assignment in a city near a sick or recovering family. Whether your loved one recently had surgery, a broken bone or is having difficultty moving around, taking a travel job in the same city or region gives you an opportunity to help family in a way you might not be able to otherwise. If you’ve ever had to face a more serious diagnosis in your family like ALS or cancer, these types of situations can prompt even the most dedicated staff nurse to hit the road as a traveler. Temporarily working as a travel nurse may ensure that other family members won’t have to uproot their lives, sell their house or find a new job, adding stress on top of an already tough situation.

On the other hand, travel nursing allows you to take a month or more off if you need to move to another location and help family or friends experiencing a crisis. Since you’re earning more on average as a travel nurse, you can schedule a break between jobs while preventing a loss in your annual income.

“An opportunity very few career paths can offer.”

To support the family financially

The National League of Cities reported that millions of families across America are financially unstable due to student loan debt, shifting job industries and layoffs, but for various reasons are unable to uproot and move to another city where jobs or salaries are better. In these situations, working as a traveling nurse provides the perfect opportunity for a family member to take a travel nurse job in another city in order to provide for their family back at home. Temporarily leaving family in order to help them build financial stability is not unusual in today’s society and is an incredibly rewarding experience for any family member.

bigstock-Woman-Meditation-Beautiful-Ins-91037264.jpgNew relationships still unburdened by children are embracing their separate lives and interests

 

To enjoy married life in separate cities

Millennials and new grads are often advised to take the time to travel, but that doesn’t mean they have to put  relationships on hold. This advice from the X Generation has sparked the growing trend of solo traveling. Twenty-something Travel blog explained that new relationships that are still unburdened by children are embracing their separate lives and interests. These couples still value individuality, and working as a travel nurse is the perfect career for anyone who wants to have it all: family, travel and career. The source noted that time apart is even healthy for some couples. To go from living on your own to constantly around another person can be a lot. Plus, you know what they say – absence makes the heart grow fonder!

The Gypsy Nurse conducted a survey on nurses who travel without their spouses and found that many relationships can find a way to make it work. Some try to visit each other while others partake in frequent Skype dates in which couples do everything from watching television to eating dinner together. But at the end of the survey, one nurse gave sage advice to those who were still hesitant about the lifestyle.

“Enjoy your life while you can, explore the world and share what you have seen. Traveling should be on everyone’s bucket list,” concluded Laura H.